Shallow Coastal Habitats Show Vulnerability to Climate Impacts

Rocky reefs, kelp beds, sea grasses and shallow shelf habitats are most vulnerable to ocean acidification, temperature change and ultraviolet radiation. Least vulnerable are hard shelves, deep slopes, canyons, seafloors and seamount habitats. These are the findings of researcher Thomas Okey and colleagues, who investigated climate-change responses on various marine ecosystems of coastal southern British…

What We’re Learning from California’s Drought

California is now in its fourth year of drought, the worst in over a century of measurements. But how does the current drought compare to the droughts of the distant past and what can it tell us about similar droughts in the years ahead? Examining how the current drought stacks up to droughts over the…

Chinook Salmon Can Adapt to Warming Waters — Up to a Point

Warming rivers threaten the survival of Pacific salmon. As long as the rivers don’t get too warm, however, the fish may be able to adapt. In the first assessment of its kind, Canadian researchers quantified the ability of Chinook salmon to genetically adapt and acclimate to warmer waters. While Pacific salmon are susceptible to climate…

Heather Lintz Studies Movement of Plants

Heather Lintz is fascinated by intersections: the intersections of cultures, the intersections of scientific disciplines. So it’s fitting that it was an exchange trip that kick-started her career in science. The location was Ecuador, the time, the early 1990s. Lintz was then a Spanish major at the University of Oregon. Her plan was to study…

Tracking Tree Movement Along the West Coast

Scientists know that plant species in the Northern Hemisphere are moving to higher latitudes and higher elevations in response to climate change. Now a new study documents both northward and upward shifts in range for a large number of West Coast tree species. On average, plant species across northern latitudes have migrated northward more than…